1967 120W Geloso G.1/1110 Tube Amp

img_5793img_5803 img_5794 img_5796 img_5797 img_5798 img_5800 img_5801img_5810

There are fuses taped all over this +100W beast…. looks like professional artists: Animations & Spectacles. Here’s the story on the original owners of the amp.

I cut out the two yellow death capacitors: img_5816

The power chord was cut and should be replaced by a modern 3 prong cord.img_5815

New 3-prong grounded power cord installed. After removing the death capacitors, the grounding point is free to connect the common wire from the three prong cord.

img_5817

1969 Geloso G.1/1040 40W EL34 Tube Amp

Here’s another nice vintage Geloso tube amp, though already dating from 1969.  With two EL34 tubes, it sports a nice 40W of output power.

img_5669

img_5668

img_5222

img_5229

img_5232

img_5233

Unfortunately, it’s not working, and the reason is clear from these voltages: there’s only coming 245-260V off the solid state rectifier.

img_5662

With the tubes removed, the voltages are up to scratch: 360V

img_5663img_5712 img_5672 img_5667

img_5780

1966 Geloso 3215 Tube Amp

It may be due to Flanders irrevocable ties to the Holy See or just because of the numerous musical Italian immigrants, but there are a lot of Italian Geloso amps for sale in the low countries.

Giovanni (John) Geloso (1901 – 1969) was an Argentinian immigrant who established one of the most important electronics factories in pre and postwar Italy.  More information on the Geloso company can be found here.

This is a 17W 1967 Geloso G3215:

img_5308An 1967 handwired, all tube 17W amp running a set of tubes very familiar to the guitar player and hence affordable!  ECC83 or 12AX7 for the preamp, EL84 power tubes and a EZ81 rectifier. In fact, this is the exact tube complement of an earlier incarnation of the Vox AC15.

Filaments of the preamp tubes are run off negative DC, which assures absolutely noiseless operation. And there is the extra filter coil often omitted in guitar amps.

geloso_3215-pdf_1

img_5313

This amp still had all the original Geloso branded tubes:

img_5312

img_5314

The amp was sold to me in working condition. In the context of tube technology, this often means, the tubes glow up.  So it was in this case, tubes glowed, but no sound.  Things only changed when I changed the mains power switch from 240V to 220V – then this little Italian beast came to live.  It is loud, noiseless and has an absolutely acceptable guitar tone.  I decided to install an input jack and keep the amp stock for now.  The big yellow capacitors are not Geloso, but Sprague, date coded 1966, 26th week.

img_5316

Input jacks are shielded from the rest of the circuit.  The wiring is to a very high standard as are the components, who are holding up perfectly, even after half a century.

img_5315

An additional advantage of these Geloso amps is that they allow you to drive any speaker from 1.5 ohms up to a 1000 ohms.

img_5309

For now, I installed speaker jack in such a way that you can switch the ends to different poles on the output transformer.

img_5339

Cleaned up, input jack and chicken heads installed:

img_5341

img_5340

Tube Radio Guitar Amp: Part 1 Exploring

I bought another tube radio, it’s a Philips B5X42A.  This is getting seriously addictive, but it’s better to be fixed on €10 junk nobody really wants than getting hooked on buying every Vox amp around, even that silly little white one.  So I spotted a guy selling several tube radios on a classifieds website, contacted him and went over there. He opened up his garage and there was a plethora of tube radio and bakelite goodness. I could only be honest:

‘That’s a stunning collection you have there. I am really looking for a tube radio to convert into a guitar amp. So anything you have lying around of which the radio part isn’t properly functioning, but the main amp is, I am interested in. The higher the wattage, the better.’

‘But then you are better off buying a guitar amp, that’s better suited than this. I don’t have any real throwaways, I repair everything myself.’

‘I have several great tube amps at home, a sixties Fender and an original 65 WEM Watkins. I also have two 5W single ended amps and am currently building a 50’s design guitar amp. But have you ever bought a new power transformer for a tube amp? Do you know what they cost?’

‘I just throw them away, had a box of them around here until last week.’

‘Well, if you want to build a guitar amp, the cheapest transformers you can buy are around €50, this is for 5W amps’

‘Whot?’

‘I tell you, if I buy a €15 non working tube radio that isn’t burnt out, I can probably salvage all power transformers (+€50/piece), output transformers (+€30/piece).  I knows it’s junk and the real reason tube technology went down the drain, but if you have to buy them in specialized shops nowadays, you pay for being in a niche market’

‘What kind of tube do these guitar amp generally use?’

‘In European denomination mostly EL84 as power tubes and ECC83 for preamps…’

‘Well, then I think I might have some chassis lying around for you…’

We made a deal for €10 for a Philips B5X42B from about 1964:

philips

 

 

 

 

 

That’s how it looked back in the day, celexa 40 mg what I bought looked more like something the cat dragged in last night, and the reaction of the wife was accordingly.

IMG_5058

Mine doesn’t look at snazzy anymore, the enclosure is not included, but more importantly the looks, is finding the phono input, which may require googling the back panel of the unit in question:

philipsb5x

 

 

 

 

The pickup (PU) jack has three contacts, one for the left mono channel, one for ground and one for the right mono channel… because this is a stereo amp. It has two distinct signal paths: here is only the stereo amp part of the schematic.

deatilEach of the signal paths uses half of a ECC83 (=12AX7) for preamp and one EL84 as power tube. If you consider that the rectifier in this radio is EZ81, it become clear that you have everything to here to build an Vox AC-15 (minus the tremolo).

The reason so many questions about converting radio’s to guitar amps remain unanswered is clear to me now: using it as a guitar amp requires no work at all, just connecting to the phone input. But converting it means getting rid of everything that is in the red square:

schematiccomplete

 

 

 

 

That is like 2/3 of the circuit.  This may seem like a difficult job, but it really isn’t because these parts of the circuit are switched in and out.  In fact, we should also get rid of the double stereo part. In fact, we can make one hell of guitar amp using this chassis, power transformer, tube sockets, even tubes… we may have to buy a new output transformer, BECAUSE: if the power transformer is powering the amp section (= one AC15) plus a whole bunch of other tubes, it may become the heart of a serious amp. I dare not believe what the label promises:

philips

That the cabinet is not included, is a shame, it would need almost no work to be converted into a nice guitar amp head:

b5x

 

Not exactly the same model, only the cabinet is different. Very helpful if you want to know which controls do what.

Stay tuned (haha!) for part 2 where we will be plugging in…

1963 WEM Watkins Control ER15 & Pick-A-Bass cabinet

wem01wem02 wem03

 

This nice little 15 watt all tube amp head was built by the British WEM Watkins company in 1963/4.  At this time, bands played in clubs and used at max 30W amps and the Beatles were still playing their Vox AC-30’s through the stadion PA when they called it quits after Shea Stadion.  The equipment simply was not holding up to the task in 1965, but by 1967 Jimi Hendrix was shredding away: what had changed?

Charlie and Reg Watkins had started their record shop in 1948 and switch to selling guitars and accordeons some two year later. Charlie is mainly interested in electronics:

In 1949, my fascination with the guitar, its mechanics and now its electronic reproduction paved the way to the first Watkins "Westminster" Guitar amplifiers and later the "Copicat" Echo and the "V" Fronted Dominator amplifier. 

The breakthrough which really put WEM on the map happened in 1966:

Invention of the "Slave" P.A. System. Possibly the most rewarding and personally satisfying development. In a world bristling with the likes of Alvin Lee and his Ten Years After, The Faces, Jethro Tull, Rod Stewart, Hendrix and indeed the Rolling Stones with so many brilliant groups waiting to emerge but who were unable to do so for the lack of a powerful and competent sound system. This limited the exposure of groups to small venues and pubs or whatever size a couple of lashed up Marshall 100 or Hi Watt ordering celexa Guitar stacks could handle. 
Charlie Watkins
Charlie Watkins

It’s hard to determine how many amps they put out per year and there is also hardly no information on the Watkins serials. I do have the impression that in the early 60s they were not product bound: the cabinet I own has a similar tag with a different number. I might have to take it apart and check the date codes on the potentiometers if they haven’t been replaced, but on the basis of the serial, this unit will be 1964/1965.

Serial #00951
Serial #00951

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

wem_set01

I had the cabinet for some years, but it was missing a speaker. Could have gone overboard and spent load of money trying to source the original speaker, but as the thing is meant to be played, I opted for something that’s an affordable solid alternative: Jensen C12Q-16 Ceramic Vintage 12″ Guitarspeaker 35 Watt
RMS, 16 Ohms, 1,25″ voice coil used by Fender Bandmaster, Deluxe
Reverb, Pro and Vibrolux.

WEM Watkins Pick-A-Bass cabinet with new 12" Jensen speaker. Cabinet serial #1150
WEM Watkins Pick-A-Bass cabinet with new 12″ Jensen speaker. Cabinet serial #1150

Around the late 60’s Marshall cloned this exact amp and issues the Marshall 18W Combo. It’s basically running the same configuration a little hotter.

1965/6 Marshall 18W Combo (James Stevensons Collection)
Comparison between WEM ER15 and Marshall 18W by tonegeek.com

instruct er15